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Alcoholics Anonymous And The Steps

The Start Of Alcoholics Anonymous


Many people that were alcoholics were able to get over the condition through the help of the groups such as Alcoholics Anonymous. Founded in 1935 by Bill Wilson and Dr. Bob Smith (who both were recovering alcoholics), Alcoholics Anonymous were started as a community fellowship for recovering alcoholics to encourage them to stay sober. The journey to recovery is aided by the 12 stages that guide the operations of AA. Many people that have recovered from alcoholism always have something positive to say about the group and the help they were accorded.


Today, Alcoholics Anonymous has more than 2,000,000 active members all over the world and more than 50 thousand of support groups countrywide.


What You Will Find At An Aa Meeting

Arriving at the decision to go to an AA meeting can be scary and very uncomfortable, especially for people who don't realise what to expect from it. It means stepping out of your comfort zone, visiting a room full of people you don't know who have a similar problem and just like you need help to get better. It however gets easy becomes all the members share a common experience like yours. It must be understood that the organisation was founded by recovering alcoholics, and the model has served the community well even to this day. Every individual within AA has been through a problem before and has cultivated a unique feeling of community and understanding among recovering alcoholics.


New members are made to feel comfortable Although there is no requirement to contribute, this is always encouraged. The meeting participants know from experience that a new member may not find talking about themselves readily at first. During the meetings, the people present will openly discuss various issues about their lives and this helps many of them to find peace.


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The Differences Of Open And Closed Aa Meetings

A closed AA meeting is attended only by recovering alcoholic addicts or those seeking to know how to go about kicking the habit.

On the other hand, friends, spouses and family members are welcome to attend open meetings. You may choose the type of meeting you feel comfortable attending. A certain share of the people attending these meetings prefer to keep their therapy separated from the rest of their lives. However, some people recover faster when their families and friends are near them.


12 Stages Of Recovery

The 12 steps which originated from Alcoholics Anonymous are presently the standards which are applied by all addiction recovery groups. These steps are written one after another, but group members realise that in fact they go in a circle. A patient may repeat a particular step until they are certified with the results.

The initial step requires an alcoholic to admit that he or she has a problem and needs help to overcome the same. Subsequently, the steps include making decisions to quit, accepting yourselves and others the wrongs which may have been committed, making amends for the wrongdoings along with making a commitment to improve continually. Learn more about the twelve steps here.


Common Reasons For Not Attending Aa

Some people do not want to attend the gatherings because of excuses. Some of the common oppositions which people have in mind are:

  • They do not believe these meetings will be helpful
  • The guilt of meeting familiar faces
  • They haven't yet accepted they are addicts and need help

It is important at this stage to focus on the fact that you have genuine reasons for having considered going to the meetings in the first place even if the other reasons are weighing heavily on you.

If you think you need help, most likely you do. There will be no harm for you if you go to a meeting; besides, it can potentially save you from years of suffering caused by your addiction.


Finding An Alcoholics Anonymous Group Near You

The AA groups are widespread everywhere and you will definitely find one near you. It's easy to attend these meetings because the groups tend to meet up regularly. Choose the kind of a meeting you want to attend - a closed or open one - and in what area, and you will be able to find a group online using our meeting finder. Let us provide you the help to find an AA group today please contact 0800 246 1509.