Talk to Frank resources-for-family

About Talk To Frank

Converse with Frank is the extensive running anti-drug movement the UK has had. Yet, has it halted anybody taking drugs?

Drug education in the UK was changed forever ten years ago when a Swat team raided a quiet suburban kitchen. The doom and gloom teachings coupled with pushing to keep away from the drug pushers who are everywhere was thrown out. A lighter, more humorous approach was used instead.


The first advert presented an adolescent inviting the police to come and arrest his mum because the mum wanted them to talk about drugs. But the new information being passed is "Drugs are illegal. Talking about them isn't. So, Talk to Frank."


Frank Friendly Confidential Drug Advice

Thought up by promotion organization Mother, Frank was, indeed, the new name for the National Drugs Helpline. It was intended to be a put stock in "elder brother" assumes that youngsters could swing to for advice concerning illegal substances. Frank is has become a household name among the young people due to the many adventure stories that came from the theme such as Pablo the drugs mule dog to a tour of the brain warehouse.


The agency behind Frank has said that it was crucial that Frank was never actually seen so he could never be the target of ridicule for wearing the wrong thing or trying to be cool. Many people have high regard for the YouTube spoof videos of Frank too. There is additionally no sign that Frank is a specialist of the services, something that makes it uncommon in the annals of government-supported movements.

Education about drug has come a long way since Nancy Reagan and the UK cast of Grange Hill told kids to "Just Say No," which a lot of people not believe was completely counterproductive.


Like the Frank campaign, most European ads now focus on giving unbiased information so that young people can make up their own minds. There are still images of prison cells and hurt parents being presented in countries that have strong penalties for drugs possession. You play, you pay. is the ad used to warn young people going for night clubbing in Singapore.

In the UK, the Above the Influence campaign has cost the federal government millions of dollars and uses humour and cautionary stories to encourage people to choose positive alternatives to drugs The focus of the campaign is to talk to the youth in a language they understand, like the one ad showing a group of "stoners" stranded on a coach. However, an amazing number of anti-drug battles far and wide still fall back on terrify strategies and specifically, the drug driven "fall into hell." One typical example was a part of the Canadian DrugsNot4Me program showed an attractive, confident young woman then into a wasting, hollow eyes shadow at the hand of drugs.

Ads that reveal the dangers of drug abuse mostly push frustrated people into experimenting with drugs, according to a data from the anti-drugs campaign of the UK from 1999 to 2004.


By demonstrating how the drugs affect the use, giving the highs and lows, Frank was not supported by the Conservative politicians on the new path it had taken.


An early online advertisement told people that cocaine made you feel on of the world.

It wasn't at all times simple to balance the message correctly. Matt Powell, the man behind the cocaine advertisement and then creative director of the digital agency, Profero, currently thinks he formed a too favourable estimate of the attention span of the typical person who browses the Internet. It is difficult for some to view the ad till the last point where the dangers of drug use were listed. Establishing the integrity of the Frank brand by telling the youth the truth about drugs and their effects was the ultimate aim of the ad, Powell states.

According to the Home Office, up to 67% of teenagers preferred to talk to Frank if drug advice becomes necessary. In 2011 and 2012, Frank received 225,892 calls and 3,341,777 visits to the website. It is evidence that the method is effective.

But, we don't have any proofs that people have quit drug consumption because of Frank, just as we don't have such evidence in cases of other media campaigns against drugs.

More than 9% drop has been witnessed in the country since the campaign came into place, but a drop in the use of cannabis has been given as an explanation for this, probably because teenagers are changing their approach towards tobacco smoking.


What Is Frank?

FRANK was launched in 2003 as a collaborated effort of the Department of Health and Home Office of the British government as a national drug education service. It was designed to lower the rate of both legal and illegal drug use by providing education to teenagers and young people about what the effects of using drug and alcohol could be. It has had several media campaigns on the Internet and the radio.


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Services

Available services at FRANK for those who seek help about drugs include

  • The FRANK website
  • A private phone number, accessible 24 hours a day
  • Email
  • An anonymous live chat every afternoon 2-6pm
  • A service to find treatment and counselling